benwinstagram:

harry is that friend you invite to a party you’re family’s at lowkey hoping he chills and then you find him at the table telling your parents they did a good job banging all those years ago while lowkey making eyes at your dad

i appreciate your concern, but at my college we interact a great deal with autism speaks and support it. you shouldn't focus on what they're doing wrong, because none of it is terrible, but focus on what they are trying to do for people with all different levels of autism.

autisticfandomthings:

Things you apparently don’t consider terrible:

Posting a video of a mother talking about how she wanted to kill her child while that same child  was in the room listening. 

Supporting the eugenic abortion of autistic people.

Failing to condemn the murders of autistic children.

Supporting the Judge Rotenburg Center, which according the the UN, tortures autistic people.

It is terrible, only 3% of their budget goes towards services, there are no autistic people on their board, they literally support eugenics. They are doing absolutely nothing good. 

This is widely know withing the autistic community and they are pretty universally hated by autistic people. Because they are terrible. They only even bother pretending to care about little white boys.

http://goldenheartedrose.tumblr.com/A$

Read that link. Read it.

And here is the resignation letter of the sole autistic person they had in an important (but still non board) position

http://jerobison.blogspot.ca/2013/11/i-resign-my-roles-at-autism-speaks.html

Here’s a flyer by a major autism advocacy organisation on them

https://autisticadvocacy.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Autism_Speaks_Flyer.pdf

OR, if you still don’t give a fuck about what autistic people think or want, (which seems kind of obvious from the content of this ask) here are some links written by non autistic people.

Here’s a post from the CEO of one of the oldest charities in the US for intellectually and developmentally disabled people. 

http://blog.thearc.org/2013/11/16/open-letter-suzanne-wright-co-founder-autism-speaks/


Here’s a post from a major autism parenting magazine

http://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/issue-14-asd-options-living-independently/#.U_-CfPldWMM


And here are some other posts

http://smallbutkindamighty.com/2013/04/02/why-i-dont-support-autism-speaks-which-is-why-i-dont-light-it-up-blue/

http://emmashopebook.com/2013/11/13/whats-wrong-with-autism-speaks/

If you continue to support them now you are in possession of this information, then it is clear that you are not an ally to autistic people, you don’t want to help us, and are probably just doing your charity work for “oh look at me, I’m a good person” points.

If you support autism speaks, you are not supporting autistic people, you are hurting us. And you are doing it knowingly and consciously.

Please spread this, not enough people know.


Lana Del Rey for Fashion Magazine

Lana Del Rey for Fashion Magazine

thegirlhabit:

Natalia @ Versace Haute Couture fw2002

thelibrariansdaughter:

Every time I watch Star Trek and I hear someone yell “Captain on the bridge!” I imagine this really cute scenario where everyone has a competition to see who can say “Captain on the bridge!” first so everyone screams it as soon as they see him so it’s all jumbled and loud and Kirk laughs so hard he has to leave I just think that would be adorable

thegirlwithgoldeyes:

thegirlwithgoldeyes:

She had curves in all the wrong places. She had a boob sticking out of her kneecap and I’d never seen an ass on the back of someone’s head before

She had legs that went on forever. And ever, and ever. Legs going on into the endless primordial void from which we all came from and to which we shall all return. Her toes touched infinity, her hips perched on the cessation of existence.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

procoffee:

I like boys who show emotion because I like to be the cold hearted one in a relationship.